Iced green teas & cold-brewing tea

A lovely page of instructions how to brew cold green tea, with different sections for sencha, matcha and bancha (houjicha – my favourite!) from a tea plantation/seller in Uji, Japan. An online customer even managed to visit and tour the plantation!

I first learnt the technique of cold-brewing tea last November, courtesy of the shop assistant in the shop at the Pinglin Tea Museum (see also here), outside Taipei. She told us that brewing from cold water reduces the amount of caffeine that is produced in the brew. She also said that hot tea left to go cold would go ‘sour’ quickly, even if refrigerated after cooling; however, cold-brewed tea could last longer – but up to 3 days only – if kept in the fridge the whole time.

Interestingly enough, the house special of the local baozhong tea 包 種 茶 tasted quite dull as a hot tea, but very clean and refreshing as a cold brew!

Here are instructions on brewing cold teas taken from the pamphlet produced by the shop located in the Pinglin Tea Museum.

Wenshen Paochong (Pinglin Paochong) tea
wenshen-paochong_450.jpg

Eastern Beauty (Dongfang Meiren) tea
dongfang-meiren_450.jpg

Green tea
green-tea-450.jpg

Alishan Oolong tea
alishan-oolong-450.jpg

Where to find the Cha Xiang Yuan company in Taiwan:
cha-xiang-yuan-450.jpg

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One Response

  1. If green tea is brewed by the cold water infusion method, are any of the healthful catechin polyphenols lost which are normally released when the tea is brewed in the traditonal manner using hot water?

    I thank you for your answer.

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